Florrie premieres new single ‘Too Young to Remember’ music video

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Florrie premieres new single ‘Too Young to Remember’ music video
Wedgewood Fine China

Source: [gallery type="circle" ids="174,171,170"] Fun, bright, sophisticated or stylish - the fine dining china of Wedgwood is a pleasure to behold. A must for anyone looking for that touch of history in their dining setting, Wedgwood has been supplying pretty dinnerware, tea ware, and other chinaware to stylish diners (and tea lovers) since its founding in 1759. Upon perusing their site today I discovered that they have some sweet additions to the classic collections, with contributing designers like Vera Wang creating understated plate patterns, polite champagne flutes and photo frames in a wedding collection, as well as this utterly delightful little 'kissing bell' which I'm completely in love with! (And would use as a dinner bell.) vera-wang-infinity-kissing-bell-091574218618 Wedgwood is a wonderful company for wedding present gift lists and is perfectly suited to fitting out a home with those fine ceramic or silver touches. My favourite collection is the Butterfly Bloom tea collection of pretty vintage florals and butterflies, hand decorated and gilded with 24ct gold and inspired by Wedgwood's 18th century pattern archives. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="179,178,177,172,161,159" orderby="rand"] Of all the pieces, the three tiered cake stand is the one I like the best, and I think the little plates would be adorable for serving nibbles to guests. Also, some of the items of the Harlequin collection fit in well and complement the fun theme of Butterfly Bloom - like the bold Yellow Ribbons Cup and Saucer the Ribbon Rose Cup and Saucer, and Turquoise Crocus Teacup and Saucer. So pretty, so fun! [gallery type="circle" ids="176,158,173" orderby="rand"] In the long run, my style of choice would be the Wedgwood willow pattern blue & whites. Classic enough to use every day and popular enough to further furnish the collection from any other blue and white china sets, it's a pattern that's easy to add to over the years while maintaining a sophisticated consistency. [gallery type="circle" ids="193,192,191"]     [gallery type="square" ids="167,182,175"]  
Florrie premieres new single ‘Too Young to Remember’ music video
Wedgewood Fine China

Source: [gallery type="circle" ids="174,171,170"] Fun, bright, sophisticated or stylish - the fine dining china of Wedgwood is a pleasure to behold. A must for anyone looking for that touch of history in their dining setting, Wedgwood has been supplying pretty dinnerware, tea ware, and other chinaware to stylish diners (and tea lovers) since its founding in 1759. Upon perusing their site today I discovered that they have some sweet additions to the classic collections, with contributing designers like Vera Wang creating understated plate patterns, polite champagne flutes and photo frames in a wedding collection, as well as this utterly delightful little 'kissing bell' which I'm completely in love with! (And would use as a dinner bell.) vera-wang-infinity-kissing-bell-091574218618 Wedgwood is a wonderful company for wedding present gift lists and is perfectly suited to fitting out a home with those fine ceramic or silver touches. My favourite collection is the Butterfly Bloom tea collection of pretty vintage florals and butterflies, hand decorated and gilded with 24ct gold and inspired by Wedgwood's 18th century pattern archives. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="179,178,177,172,161,159" orderby="rand"] Of all the pieces, the three tiered cake stand is the one I like the best, and I think the little plates would be adorable for serving nibbles to guests. Also, some of the items of the Harlequin collection fit in well and complement the fun theme of Butterfly Bloom - like the bold Yellow Ribbons Cup and Saucer the Ribbon Rose Cup and Saucer, and Turquoise Crocus Teacup and Saucer. So pretty, so fun! [gallery type="square" ids="158,176,173" orderby="rand"] In the long run, my style of choice would be the Wedgwood willow pattern blue & whites. Classic enough to use every day and popular enough to further furnish the collection from any other blue and white china sets, it's a pattern that's easy to add to over the years while maintaining a sophisticated consistency. [gallery type="circle" ids="193,192,191"]        
Florrie premieres new single ‘Too Young to Remember’ music video
Wedgewood Fine China

Source: [gallery type="circle" ids="174,171,170"] Fun, bright, sophisticated or stylish - the fine dining china of Wedgwood is a pleasure to behold. A must for anyone looking for that touch of history in their dining setting, Wedgwood has been supplying pretty dinnerware, tea ware, and other chinaware to stylish diners (and tea lovers) since its founding in 1759. Upon perusing their site today I discovered that they have some sweet additions to the classic collections, with contributing designers like Vera Wang creating understated plate patterns, polite champagne flutes and photo frames in a wedding collection, as well as this utterly delightful little 'kissing bell' which I'm completely in love with! (And would use as a dinner bell.) vera-wang-infinity-kissing-bell-091574218618 Wedgwood is a wonderful company for wedding present gift lists and is perfectly suited to fitting out a home with those fine ceramic or silver touches. My favourite collection is the Butterfly Bloom tea collection of pretty vintage florals and butterflies, hand decorated and gilded with 24ct gold and inspired by Wedgwood's 18th century pattern archives. [gallery type="rectangular" ids="179,178,177,172,161,159"] Of all the pieces, the three tiered cake stand is the one I like the best, and I think the little plates would be adorable for serving nibbles to guests. Also, some of the items of the Harlequin collection fit in well and complement the fun theme of Butterfly Bloom - like the bold Yellow Ribbons Cup and Saucer the Ribbon Rose Cup and Saucer, and Turquoise Crocus Teacup and Saucer. So pretty, so fun! [gallery type="square" ids="158,176,173" orderby="rand"] In the long run, my style of choice would be the Wedgwood willow pattern blue & whites. Classic enough to use every day and popular enough to further furnish the collection from any other blue and white china sets, it's a pattern that's easy to add to over the years while maintaining a sophisticated consistency. [gallery type="circle" ids="193,192,191"]        
Florrie premieres new single ‘Too Young to Remember’ music video
Wedgewood Fine China

Source: [gallery type="circle" ids="174,171,170"] Fun, bright, sophisticated or stylish - the fine dining china of Wedgwood is a pleasure to behold. A must for anyone looking for that touch of history in their dining setting, Wedgwood has been supplying pretty dinnerware, tea ware, and other chinaware to stylish diners (and tea lovers) since its founding in 1759. Upon perusing their site today I discovered that they have some sweet additions to the classic collections, with contributing designers like Vera Wang creating understated plate patterns, polite champagne flutes and photo frames in a wedding collection, as well as this utterly delightful little 'kissing bell' which I'm completely in love with! (And would use as a dinner bell.) vera-wang-infinity-kissing-bell-091574218618 Wedgwood is a wonderful company for wedding present gift lists and is perfectly suited to fitting out a home with those fine ceramic or silver touches. My favourite collection is the Butterfly Bloom tea collection of pretty vintage florals and butterflies, hand decorated and gilded with 24ct gold and inspired by Wedgwood's 18th century pattern archives. [gallery type="square" ids="179,178,177,172,161,159"] Of all the pieces, the three tiered cake stand is the one I like the best, and I think the little plates would be adorable for serving nibbles to guests. Also, some of the items of the Harlequin collection fit in well and complement the fun theme of Butterfly Bloom - like the bold Yellow Ribbons Cup and Saucer the Ribbon Rose Cup and Saucer, and Turquoise Crocus Teacup and Saucer. So pretty, so fun! [gallery type="square" ids="158,176,173"] In the long run, my style of choice would be the Wedgwood willow pattern blue & whites. Classic enough to use every day and popular enough to further furnish the collection from any other blue and white china sets, it's a pattern that's easy to add to over the years while maintaining a sophisticated consistency. [gallery type="circle" ids="193,192,191"]        

The singer has teamed up with H&M to produce a visual for new single ‘Too Young to Remember’, which will be out in the UK on March 8.

Wear it dry, and you’ve got your standard dusting of color—classic and predictable (in a good way). But wet! Wearing it wet opens a whole new world of opportunity. “What you’re doing is bringing out the pigmented nature of the shadow,” makeup artist Vincent Oquendo says. “Whenever I wet an eye shadow, it’s when I really want it to pop—but it really has to be a special kind of product to be able to blend after it sets. Because a lot of the times when it sets, you get streaking.” Nobody wants that. In order to avoid any wet shadow mishaps, follow these guidelines:

Product

First, go with the obvious: any eye shadow labeled wet-to-dry. The Nars Dual-Intensity line is the standout—the singles come in 12 different shimmery shades, and there’s a corresponding brush (then there’s the newly released Dual Intensity Blush line, which was all over Fashion Week—but that’s a product for another post). Burberry also makes a few very versatile shades specifically for this in their Wet & Dry Silk Shadows. And the technique-specific eye shadow category isn’t just a ploy to get you to buy more product. “You can’t just use any eye shadow for this,” Vincent says. “Certain ones will harden up on top and become unusable because they’re not made for this.”

Baked shadows are also fair game—we’re fans of Laura Mercier’s Baked Eye Colour Wet/Dry and Lorac’s Starry-Eyed Baked Eye Shadow Trio in particular.

For more advanced players, Vincent suggests moving on to straight pigment (MAC or even OCC’s Pure Cosmetic Pigments). With the added moisture, they’ll become easier to layer with other products. For a look with more depth, try using a cream shadow as a based before swiping with a wet powder shadow. “It’s like insurance,” Vincent says. “You’re doubling your wearability.

Brush
This all depends on exactly what you want to do. “Mind the resistance,” Vincent says, particularly if you’re looking for uniform color across the lid. “I tend to recommend a blender brush, which is the brush that looks like a feather duster. If you do it with a stiff brush, you’re defeating yourself before you even start. The joy of a wet-to-dry is you have to get it right amount of product loaded up, and then it blends itself. If the brush is too stiff, it will leave the shadow streaky and then much harder to control.”

However, if tightlining or waterlining is in the cards, a much thinner brush is required accordingly.

Liquid
Do not, repeat, do not put eye drops, water, or any other sort of liquid directly on your eye shadow. This’ll screw up your product for later use. “Lately, I’ve been wetting the brush with the Glossier Soothing Face Mist, but Evian Mineral Water Spray is good for sensitive eyes,” Vincent says. If the top of your powder does get a little hardened by wet application, there’s a trick to remove it: Get a clean mascara spoolie and “exfoliate” your compact, Vincent recommends. This won’t crack the compact and will make it ready to go once more.

Photographed by Tom Newton.

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